Thursday, December 6, 2018


















Amazon Photography Tour
with Dante Fenolio
November 9 - 16, 2019

An exciting opportunity to observe and photograph the fantastic wildlife of the Amazon Rainforest in a relaxed and fun setting.
Dante Fenolio, wildlife photographer and renowned zoologist with world wide experience, led this photo trip for us last year and is now returning to his favorite forests.
Extraordinary experience at a GREAT price. You can get on a  list to receive more info as it becomes available (there is a link to that on the web page).

But, we are now taking bookings and the trip will likely fill up quickly.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Photography-Trip.html

 

Friday, November 30, 2018

   
                                                                           














The Manu birding tour and Machu Picchu trips we did through GreenTracks were great. I was amazed how organized and professional the team was. Our guide Lady provided an informative tour of Machu Picchu. William our birding guide was extremely knowledgeable and very accommodative to our requests. The weather was quite rainy but we knew this would be a possibility when we booked the trip for the start of the rainy season. The van drivers, boat drivers and lodge staff were very professional and gave outstanding service. We managed to find approx. 240 bird species, 6 species of monkeys and one sloth and got some great photographs. William is an amazing birder and I would highly recommend him to anyone going on a Peru birding trip. Thanks very much for your efforts and to GreenTracks for making this a very memorable and enjoyable trip.

Lennart Sopuck, 2018



https://www.greentracks.com/ 



 

Wednesday, November 28, 2018


















We are now taking bookings for the Tom Crutchfield Amazon Herping Tour, November 2 - 9, 2019.  (There is only one trip planned for 2019. Tom Crutchfield can not commit to another and we expect the trip will fill quickly again this year.) Get signed up for this annual experience in the Peruvian Amazon hosted by three leading experts: Tom Crutchfield, Danté Fenolio and Bill Lamar. Some folks have done this trip several times. As always, the focus will be on the wide variety of reptiles and amphibians (and invertebrates), but we will also be finding lots of incredible birds, monkeys, sloths and other rainforest wildlife. There will be excursions both day and night on forest trails and on the fantastic Canopy Walkway.  With Tom, Danté and Bill you will have tons of entertainment and laughter as they regale you with stories of past adventures and insights into the amazing animals you will be seeing.  See old friends and make new friends. And who knows what new critters might be found as no two trips are ever exactly the same.
    Book now as these trips Sell Out every year. It’s easy to do with the PDF Application or the NEW on-line booking application.  A partly refundable $200 deposit is all it takes and the balance is not due until 45 days before the November 2 - 9 trip starts...September 25.

All the details about this trip here:
https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

A PDF document of the Itinerary and Details can be downloaded here:
https://GreenTracks.com/PDF/Crutchfield Lamar Fenolio Amazon Herping Tour 2019.PDF

 

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

                                                                                     















Tarantulas, much maligned by gratuitous use in horror films, are harmless and interesting creatures.  Arboreal species like this Avicularia juruensis, are agile experts at capturing moths.

https://www.greentracks.com


 

Monday, November 26, 2018















Most moths are nocturnal but the Amazon White-tailed Moth (Urania leilus) is a notable exception.  Strongly migratory, these beautiful, iridescent moths frequent riverbanks and they are notoriously fond of urine.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Saturday, November 24, 2018
















Amazon Treesnakes (Imantodes lentiferus) and their cousins are superbly adapted for life above the ground.  Unbelievably slender and delicate, they are able to span long gaps in rainforest vegetation as they cruise by night in search of small lizards and frogs.


https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Friday, November 23, 2018













The South American Coati (Nasus nasua) is a cousin of the raccoon.  Coatis usually travel in groups and they make continuous whining noises as they scramble through the brush in search of almost anything they can overpower.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

















There are frogs and then there are weird frogs.  Years ago a detailed study of the Cashew Frog (Nyctimantis rugiceps) was published in order to establish its relationships.  The conclusion? Nobody knows!


https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Tuesday, November 20, 2018




















More monkey business. Not to be outdone, a Common Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) goes after bananas.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Monday, November 19, 2018




















From the 2018 Amazon Herping Tours

Remember butterflies? An astonishing number of them have disappeared from our back yards over the years so it is great to see them in the rainforest.  Since many species crave salt and other minerals they are also happy to see sweating humans!  This Amazon Beauty (Baeotus aeilus) is picking up trace elements from our clothing that is drying in the sun.


https://www.greentracks.com

 

Saturday, November 17, 2018

 
   


















 From the 2018 Amazon Herping Tours

Monkey Frogs are the amphibian equivalents of chameleons; they possess opposable thumbs and walk slowly through vines and underbrush.  The Silver-eyed Monkey Frog (Phyllomedusa vaillanti), is capable of changing color from bright to dark green

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html
                                                          






 

Friday, November 16, 2018
















From the 2018 Amazon Herping Tours

Leaf-footed Bugs (Diactor bilineatus) feed on the leaves of passion fruits and they are therefore chock full of cyanogenic glucosides which make them toxic.  As a result, they are brightly colored (a warning) and easily approached, which makes them fun to photograph!


https://www.greentracks.com

 

Thursday, November 15, 2018

                                                                             












From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Bill Lamar gently persuades an Aquatic Coralsnake (Micrurus surinamensis) to pose for photos. Kids, don’t try this at home! Only someone with the knowledge and years of experience that Bill has can do this safely.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html
   



Tuesday, November 13, 2018



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

 A newly described, gigantic, Rhinoceros Beetle (Megasoma rex) found on the Herping Tour.

https://www.greentracks.com


 

Monday, November 12, 2018

                                                                                     

We have received another very nice letter from two participants of this year’s Amazon Herping Tour.   This program has become very popular.  Below is a link to information on the 2019 Amazon Herping Tour.

“If you’re looking for a real Amazon jungle experience, this is the place. Led by renowned herpetologists, scientists and native guides - all of whom are genuine good guys and who are more than willing to share their knowledge - you typically hike for three hours each night identifying, photographing, and sometimes capturing for study the exotic reptiles, amphibians and insects found in the jungle. The guides grew up in the area and are passionate about their environment. Among other things, they also led birding groups in the mornings for those who were interested. The accommodations were clean and comfortable, and every meal was delicious. If you want a first-hand experience of being in the jungle, please do consider signing up with Green Tracks. They took great care of us in every detail.”

Jack and Peggy Cahill

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html


 

Friday, November 9, 2018















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Jewels of the Amazon! The Nile has nothing on this place.  Check out this shimmering green scarab, Macraspis festiva.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Thursday, November 8, 2018

                                           
 














 From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Participants  visit the community-run San Rafael Butterfly Garden along the Amazon River in Peru.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html
                                                                           

 

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

                                                                                   













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Notes from the Amazon No.261: This is the last installment I'll make for Amazonian wildlife until I head back down early next year. We had the good fortune of observing a different species of "Dead Leaf Mantid" on this trip (Metilia brunneri). While smaller than the Leaf Mantis (Choeradodis stalii), this species is no less cryptic. One interesting side note - this species takes to flight more more readily than the larger leaf mantid species. This individual was observed in a forest tracts off of the main branch of the Amazon River, Loreto, Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

                                                                                 













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Notes from the Amazon No.260: The Paiche (Arapaima gigas) is one of the largest freshwater fishes on Earth. While exceptionally rare, specimens exceeding 4.5m (~14 feet) have been documented, with a hefty mass close to 200kg (~440lbs). The fish are endangered in the wild owing to excessive harvest – they are considered a delicacy. Many farms have been developed to produce this species. This 3m individual was staring at me in the murky waters of an Amazonian backwater – I loved the opportunity to photograph it using my rig in an underwater housing.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html


 

Monday, November 5, 2018

                                                                                     















From the GreenTracks Amazon Photo Trip,  2018

Intrepid frog finder Dr. Philipp Wagner photographs a gigantic pair of newly described Rhinoceros Beetles (Megasoma rex).

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Saturday, November 3, 2018

                                                                       



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Monkey Business! Black-mantled Tamarins (Saguinus nigricollis) pull a daring banana raid.

https://www.greentracks.com


 

Friday, November 2, 2018















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.259: The Common Anaconda (Eunectes murinus) is easily the world's heaviest snake. Masses of ~225kg (~500 pounds) have been recorded. Reliable documentation of individuals at 8 or 8.5 meters (~27-28 feet) do exist; however, stories of much larger specimens, of nearly unbelievable lengths, are colorful and common... but mostly unsubstantiated. Anacondas spend the majority of their time in water where they lie in wait of suitable prey, which can be most anything from turtles to birds to mammals, depending upon the size of the snake. The feeding strike is unbelievably swift, and prey are subdued by powerful constricting coils. Despite their shy, retiring nature, these big snakes have been the object of countless lurid television shows and movies. This specimen was photographed in a forest tract along the Amazon River, Loreto, Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Thursday, November 1, 2018

                                                                                 
















The Giant Red-wing Grasshopper (Tropidacris cristata) starts life as a nymph in prison stripes. Later the color and pattern change completely.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

         
 












Our recent Amazon Herping Trips were once again a big success with plenty of herps, friends and fun.  Now it’s time to start planning the 5th Annual Amazon Herping Trip, set for November 2 - 9, 2019, hosted by our intrepid trio of Tom Crutchfield, Danté Fenolio and Bill Lamar.  Join us, have some fun. No experience necessary, just a desire to see the magnificent Peruvian Amazon: home to lots of interesting reptiles and amphibians and other creatures of the rainforest as well as connecting with old friends and making new friends.

    Read more here...

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

   From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Henry Cohen
I just want to give a shout out to Bill Lamar, Tom Crutchfield, Dante Fenolio and guide Willy Flores Lanza for leading a fabulous herping trip in the Amazon. You sure know how to show a fella a good time. Also special thanks to Bill, Dante, and Philipp Wagner for showing me how to use the camera I've owned for 7 years. And a special thanks to George Ledvina and Scott Humfeld of Greentracks for rescuing us from our travel snafus.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

 














From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

From Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.258: Trap-jaw ants (genus Odontomachus) carry their jaws locked back and cocked while hunting. They snap together with an audible sound, holding either prey or predator to be stung. Nests are usually constructed in leaf litter and the ants are diurnal. With a worldwide tropical distribution, there are over two dozen species found in the Neotropics.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Saturday, October 27, 2018

 













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.254: The Blue-crowned Manakin (Lepidothrix coronata) is widespread throughout the Amazon Basin with a disjunct population in Panama and northwestern South America. Not surprisingly, there are geographic differences within this species so it may be a complex. Like many manakins, the males are colorful while the females tend to be unicolored, in this case an attractive shade of green. Manakins are denizens of the understory in rainforest and many species have notable lek displays that include mechanical sound production. These birds were photographed on night hikes through primary rainforest in Loreto, Peru - October 2018. After the birds have settled in for the night, they can be photographed with relative ease.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Friday, October 26, 2018

 



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.252: From time to time, we get to see small mammals in the lower canopy when we are on night hikes. This was a great encounter with a mouse opossum in a tract of forest off of the Amazon River, Loreto, Peru - October 2018. Emilia's Gracile Opossum (Gracilinanus emiliae) is native to South America's Amazon Basin. It is a diminutive marsupial with a prehensile tail. Mouse opossums are active nocturnal foragers in vine tangles and understory brush by night. The feed on insects, geckos, frogs and fruit. We need to do more to protect species like this. As the rainforests of the world evaporate into palm groves and gold mining fields, these are the species that will vanish with them. Thank you Robert Voss for the ID!


https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Thursday, October 25, 2018

 













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.251: This Amazonian Spotted Anole (Anolis {Dactyloa} punctatus) was observed during a night hike in a tract of forest off of the Amazon River, Loreto, Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Monday, October 22, 2018

From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

Pam Po-Chedley Obersheimer

I had such a great time on my trip to the Peruvian Amazon Rain Forest. I cannot say enough about what a wonderful job Green Tracks did in making this trip such an enjoyable adventure. My thanks go out to George Ledvina, Bill Lamar, Tom Crutchfield, Dante Fenolio and Scott Humfeld. As well to our local guides Willy Flores Lanza and Jonathan. They all really know how to take care of everything with kindness and caring. If any problems come up along the way, they are on it and there for you immediately to make sure all goes well.
I highly recommend Green Tracks to one and all.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

 












From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No246: Life, death and reproduction around an Amazonian rainforest pool. These species of "hatchet-faced treefrogs" are all singing about sex - trying to attract a mate and pass on their genes. But all is not well around the pond; lots of snakes love to eat small frogs. There is a real balance between being showy to attract a mate and avoiding predators.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Saturday, October 20, 2018

  



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No244: The Amazon Puffer (Colomesus asellus) has a wide distribution in the Amazon and its tributary rivers. The species can tolerate some salt in the water; inasmuch, it and can be found in coastal brackish waterways. It is a fish common to the aquarium hobby. Like other pufferfishes, these fish are poisonous to predators that try to consume them. One of the prominent skin toxins in this species is saxitoxin. The toxin that pufferfishes are so infamous for defending themselves with, tetrodotoxin, appears to be in very low concentration in this species, if present at all. Interestingly for those familiar with tetrodotoxin, the species of pufferfishes that wield the poison for defense do not appear to produce the toxic substance; rather, symbiotic bacteria produce the compound and live on the bodies of the fishes. This individual was photographed in Iquitos, Loreto, Peru, October 2018. I know I have said this before, and that to someone not familiar with the severity of the situation I sound like a broken record, but we need to do more to save the amazing biodiversity of the Amazon Basin. Please support any conservation organization with which you connect. Funding is what makes the difference.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

 













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No245: It was a "salamanderesque" kind of night several days back. We encountered four mushroom tongue salamanders in a short span of trail. One of them (depicted here) had an outstanding pattern in its eyes. The most commonly observed salamander around Iquitos is the “Nauta Mushroom Tongue Salamander” (Bolitoglossa altamazonica). It was described by Cope in 1874 (Oedipus altamazonicus). There are many salamanders masquerading as this species as it is undoubtedly a species complex across the greater region. These salamanders tend to have a patchy distribution and when you find a good spot for them, it is reliably a good spot year after year; however, we usually do not see more than several in a given night.

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

Thursday, October 18, 2018




















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

A happy encounter on our Herp Trip as Sarah makes a new friend, a baby sloth!

https://www.greentracks.com/Amazon-Herping.html

 

  



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No243: A "Mountain Crystal Tetra" (Protocheirodon pi). The mostly transparent nature of this species is phenomenal.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

 



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No242: Another rainforest trail, another cluster of crazy caterpillars. I sure have seen some great moth and butterfly larvae across the last few weeks in Amazonian Peru. The biodiversity of these forests is unreal.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Wednesday, October 17, 2018




















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No241: For me, the most spiritual moments of my life have come about on forest trails. The energy of these places, and the amazing things to see, have captivated me for years. I can't envision life without wild places.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

 



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No238: Have had a lot of fun photographing more of the freshwater fish biodiversity here in the upper Amazon Basin. This beautiful fish is the Black-top Mouse Catfish (Hassar orestis).

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Monday, October 15, 2018

 



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No234: Electric Eels (Electrophorus electricus) aren’t actually eels at all - they belong to the order Gymnotiformes and are a species of knifefish. They use their strong electrical discharges for stunning prey and in defense. The charge that these fish can generate is not trivial – one source indicated that it can be as strong as 600 volts. These animals generate their charge by way of specialized disk-shaped cells called electrocytes. Thousands of electrocytes form three electric organs within the fish. The electrocytes store power like a battery. When the electric eel needs to shock something (like a potential predator or a prey item) each electrocyte can discharge its electrical charge at the same time. A quote from an article covering a researcher studying the electrical discharge of these fish (link in comments), “'It’s impressive that a little eel could deliver that much electricity,' Catania said in a statement. These shocks were nearly ten times as powerful as a taser, and electric eels can get much larger in size with even more powerful shocks that can be lethal to animals.” Like other knifefishes, electric eels can produce much more mild currents and can generate an electric field to navigate and locate prey items. These fishes also grow to considerable size. Large individuals exceed 2 meters (over 6 feet) and can weigh in at nearly 50 pounds. This is a juvenile photographed in Amazonian Peru, October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com

 















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No235: The Long-net Stinkhorn (Phallus indusiatus) has a massive range including parts of Africa, South and Central America, Mexico, China, Japan and Australia. Among many interesting cultural uses and beliefs tied to this fungus, it is used to make harmful charms in the belief systems of several indigenous groups of Nigeria. Many biologically active compounds are present in these mushrooms. They contain chemicals that are antibacterial as well as antioxidants (polyphenols). This specimen photographed in Amazonian Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Saturday, October 13, 2018

 














From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Tom Crutchfield
Well we are spending our last night in Peru. We have been here almost 3 weeks now mostly in the Amazon. The trip back began at Ceiba Tops as we headed down the mighty Amazon River on a big boat called the Amazon Queen. A storm chased us as the rainy season has begun. Stacey began pole dancing on the way then talked me into doing it. Well I made a dollar sooo. Lol. We are spending the night in Inquitos headed to Lima tomorrow. Tonight we had dinner at a floating restaurant sitting in the mighty Amazon River.We should be back home on Sunday morning. Stacey Crutchfield & I have had an incredible adventure once again. Good by to the jungle & all the jungle spirits that live within me won’t forget you. So until next time. Peace to you all. Live life like there is no tomorrow. We are!!

https://www.greentracks.com

 





















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No131: My roommate for the last several days. This Tropical Screech Owl (Megascops choliba) lives in the rafters above the room at the forest lodge I stay in. Love the late night vocalizations but could do without him taking a dump on the floor.

https://www.greentracks.com

 






















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
 Notes from the Amazon No133: The amazing eyes of an Owlfly (Ascalaphidae): observed in a forest tract along the Amazon River, Loreto, Peru, October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Friday, October 12, 2018















Another nice response from a participant on the GreenTracks Amazon Herping trip September 29 - October 6, 2018

Dear Green Tracks...just had to write and tell you how much I enjoyed my herping adventure! I've never done anything like this and didn't know what to expect but I'm so glad I went! The lodges were clean and comfortable and the food was good ....the activities were well organized without being overly structured... Bill along with the guides from Explorama were the icing on the cake....extemely knowledgeable, personable, and just fun to talk to...i would highly recommend Green Tracks to anyone looking for a trip slightly out of the ordinary...well done!

Heather Krane

https://www.greentracks.com

 

  



















Inca Trail permits do not usually go on sale until January 2 each year, but due to increasing numbers of hikers every year, they just now went on sale for 2019. They will sell out rapidly, so if you are thinking of hiking the Inca Trail next year now is the time to book.
Permits are limited to 500 per day and that includes hikers, guides and porters.

To follow the Inca's footsteps on the royal highway to Machu Picchu is an unforgettable experience. Few other hikes in the world can offer the variety of breathtaking scenery: from high sierra to tropical jungle. No other will take you through so many well preserved archeological sites.

GreenTracks offers several Inca Trail programs of varying length as well as other treks that don’t require a permit.  We know the Inca Trail well as we have hiked it numerous times.


Read more here:
https://www.greentracks.com/Inca-Trail.html

 

Thursday, October 11, 2018

It is always nice to hear from satisfied clients.  Here is an email we received from two of them. We strive to provide the best services possible and we appreciate feedback like this.

Hi George,

Patricia and I just returned from our two week vacation on Saturday morning.

 We want to thank you and your team for providing us with the best experience of our lives. The information and detailed itinerary you provided prior to our trip prepared us completely.

 The 7 day Amazon cruise on La Perla was first class on a budget. Our room was very nice, clean and the air conditioning was fantastic. The crew provided top notch service and Patricia (cruise director) made sure everything was perfect. The food was outstanding and the boat was comfortable The land and boat excursions were informative and exciting and our guides (Juanito, Edgard and Victor) were great, friendly and knowledgeable.

 After our Amazon trip we flew to Cusco where we were picked up at the airport and taken to our hotel. The next day a private guide and driver drove us to the Sacred Valley. Then we took the train to  Aguas Calientes with our guide where we had an amazing experience ending with two days at Machu Picchu. Back at Cusco we had a great guided tour as well.

 Scott and the rest of your team made sure we had our plane boarding passes, checked in on us and simply rounded out a perfect vacation.

 We really didn’t have to plan anything. You and your team did it all. All your hotel selections were great, especially the Inka Terra in Aguas Calientes which was spectacular!

Thank you again.
Barry and Patricia Weiss

https://www.greentracks.com

 

      
 












From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.229: The eyes of an Amazonian Giant Land Snail (Megalobulimus sp.): observed in a forest tract along the Rio Amazonas, Loreto, Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

    



















From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No224: Amazonian mustache

https://www.greentracks.com

 

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

  













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No222: Parental care is something that most people associate with mammals - particularly humans. But in all truth, parental care can be found across a broad spectrum of wildlife including amphibians. Among the amphibians, poison frogs are notorious for their parental care. In many species, eggs are deposited on the forest floor until they hatch. Depending on the species, either the male or the female allows the tadpoles to squirm onto their backs. The tadpoles literally glue themselves to the back of the adult using glue glands in their lips. The adult frog then carries the tadpoles to some remote water source - often plant held waters (phytotelmata) such as bromeliad axils or water filled tree holes. The adult crawls into the water and the water soluble glue dissolves. The tadpoles then move into the private pool where they will develop. In some species, the female returns to feed infertile food eggs - providing nourishment to the developing tadpoles throughout their larval period. This is a Red-backed Poison Frog (Ranitomeya reticulata) photographed sleeping at night in the low foliage with two tadpoles glued to its back, Amazon River, Loreto, Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

   













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No223: I love to bring black lights or UV lights into the forest. This scorpion reflected the black light as it sat on a low leaf above the rainforest floor. Photographed in a tract of forest along the Amazon River, Loreto, Peru - October 2018.

https://www.greentracks.com

 

     













From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No.219: Mating Iridescent Tigers (Hypocrita plagifera - moths) on a night hike through a tract of forest on the Rio Mazan, Loreto, Peru - September 2018. Thank you Britt O'Leary for the ID!

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From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Dante Fenolio
Notes from the Amazon No221: A Speckled Worm Lizard (Amphisbaenia fuliginosa) that was observed within the city of Iquitos, Peru. These fossorial reptiles are squamates and are closely related to lizards and snakes. They have no arms or legs. In a setting like Iquitos, they are probably feeding on earthworms. The potential for herpetological finds within a city is huge for a place like Iquitos... even though the city is growing fast.


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From the GreenTracks Amazon Herping Tour 10/06 - 10/13, 2018

from Stacey Crutchfield
Today I FINALLY caught a piranha!!!! We also saw a bunch of pink river dolphins while out on the river. And saw a rainbow on the way back to the lodge!!! My day is complete...night y’all

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